Treat Zika with Herbs

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Zika is treatable In Ayurveda; In Sushrit Sanhita Vish Sansthapan; Sushrit wrote about various venom & poison I used this technique to trea Dengue. This therapy must work in Zika too I am sure. If given platform I can prove that Zika is treaable by Ayurveda.

Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the virus family Flaviviridae. It mostly in tropical area, It is spread by daytime-active Aedes mosquitoes, such as A. aegypti and A. albopictus. Its name comes from the Zika Forest of Uganda, where the virus was first isolated in 1947. Zika virus is related to the dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and West Nile viruses. Since the 1950s, it has been known to occur within a narrow equatorial belt from Africa to Asia. From 2007 to 2016, the virus spread eastward, across the Pacific Ocean to the Americas, leading to the2015–16 Zika virus epidemic.

Children born with zika virus suffer from Microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and other sewer brain defects.

Zika is treatable with herbs

Q: How do people get infected with Zika?

A: Zika primarily spread through bites of an infected Aedes species mosquito. A pregnant lady may pass to baby. Also can be infected with sex with zika infected person.

Q: What health problems can result from getting Zika?

A: in beginning many people infected with zika do not have symptoms. Later symptoms of fever, pain in joint, headache, lashes on body, reddish eye, appears.

Q: what are the birth defects of zika?

A: zika infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other brain defects a brain neurons defect causing damage to brain. New research have shown that Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an uncommon sickness of the nervous system, is strongly associated with Zika; however, only a small proportion of people with recent Zika virus infection get GBS.

Once someone has been infected with Zika, it’s very likely they’ll be protected from future infections. There is no evidence that past Zika infection poses an increased risk of birth defects in future pregnancies.

Q: What can people do to prevent Zika?

A: The best way to prevent Zika is to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites:

• Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents

• Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants

• Sleep under a mosquito bed net if air conditioned or screened rooms are not available or if sleeping outdoors.

Zika can be spread by a person infected with Zika to his or her sex partners. People whose partners have traveled to or live in an area with Zika can prevent Zika by using condoms (or other barriers that protect against infection) every time they have sex or by not having sex.

Q: What are the symptoms of Zika virus disease?

A: The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, and red eyes. Other symptoms include muscle pain and headache. Many people infected with Zika won’t have symptoms or will have mild symptoms, which can last for several days to a week.

Zika is treatable In Ayurveda; In Sushrit Sanhita Vish Sansthapan;

Sushrit wrote about various venom & poison I used this technique to treat Dengue. This therapy must work in Zika too

I am sure. If given platform I can prove that Zika is treatable by Ayurveda.

Q: Why Zika virus is outbreak Alarm

A: Zika virus is getting attention due to its alarming connection with microcephaly, a neurological disorder in babies being born with abnormally small head

Zika virus born baby with Microcephaly disease

Q: Do Zika spread through Sexual transmission?

A: yes Zika can be infected if a person has sex with zika infected person. To avoid they should have access to condoms and use them correctly and consistently. If men experience symptoms (rash, fever, arthralgia, myalgia or conjunctivitis) then they should adopt safer sexual practices or consider abstaining for at least 6 months.

Pregnancy

Q: what should couple do planning for pregnancy?

A: Couples or women planning a pregnancy, living in or returning from areas where transmission of Zika virus is known to occur, are strongly recommended to wait at least 8 weeks before trying to conceive; and 6 months if the male partner was symptomatic.

If men experience symptoms (rash, fever, arthralgia, myalgia or conjunctivitis) then they should adopt safer sexual practices or consider abstaining for at least 6 months.

Q: Can women transmit Zika virus to their fetuses during pregnancy or childbirth?

Transmission of Zika virus from pregnant women to their fetuses has been documented.

Zika virus infection close to term could potentially be transmitted during both pregnancy and at childbirth, although this has not been scientifically proven to date.

Pregnant women in general, including those who develop symptoms of Zika virus infection, should see their health-care provider for close monitoring of their pregnancy.

Q: Can mothers with Zika infection breastfeed their baby?

A: Zika virus has been detected in breast milk but there is currently no evidence that the virus is transmitted to babies through breastfeeding.

WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life.

Q: What is Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS)?

A: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nerves. The peripheral convey sensory information (e.g. pain temperature) from body to brain and motor (i.e., movement) signal from brain to body. (GBS) is characterized by weakness and numbness or tingling in the leg and arms, and possible loss of movement and feeling in the legs, arms, upper body and face.

Symptoms of GBS

(GBS) is an uncommon sickness of the nervous system in which a person’s own immune system damages the nerve cells, causing muscle weakness, and sometimes, paralysis.

• Several countries that have experienced Zika outbreaks recently have reported increases in people who have GBS.

• Current CDC research suggests that GBS is strongly associated with Zika; however, only a small proportion of people with recent Zika virus infection get GBS.

• CDC is continuing to investigate the link between GBS and Zika to learn more.

Causes of GBS

Researchers do not fully understand what causes GBS. Most people with GBS report a bacterial or viral infection before they have GBS symptoms. Rarely, vaccination has also been associated with the onset of GBS (i.e., 1976 Swine influenza vaccine).

What is Microcephaly?

Microcephaly is a birth defect where a baby’s head is smaller than expected when compared to babies of the same sex and age. Babies with microcephaly often have smaller brains that might not have developed properly. Microcephaly can occur because a baby’s brain has not developed properly during pregnancy or has stopped growing after birth, which results in a smaller head size. Microcephaly can be an isolated condition, meaning that it can occur with no other major birth defects, or it can occur in combination with other major birth defects.

Q: What are Other Problems caused by Microcephaly?

A: Babies with Microcephaly can have a range of other problems, depending on how severe their Microcephaly is. Microcephaly has been linked with the following problems:

• Seizures

• Developmental delay, such as problems with speech or other developmental milestones (like sitting, standing, and walking)

• Intellectual disability (decreased ability to learn and function in daily life)

• Problems with movement and balance

• Feeding problems, such as difficulty swallowing

• Hearing loss

• Vision problems

These problems can range from mild to severe and are often lifelong. Because the baby’s brain is small and underdeveloped, babies with severe microcephaly can have more of these problems, or have more difficulty with them, than babies with milder microcephaly. Severe microcephaly also can be life-threatening. Because it is difficult to predict at birth what problems a baby will have from microcephaly, babies with microcephaly often need close follow-up through regular check-ups with a healthcare provider to monitor their growth and development.

References:

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Content source:

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)
Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD)

Besnard M, Lastere S, Teissier A, Cao-Lormeau V, Musso D. Evidence of perinatal transmission of Zika virus, French Polynesia, December 2013 and February 2014. Eurosurveillance 2014 Apr 3;19(13):20751. Available from: Evidence of perinatal transmission of Zika virus, French Polynesia, December 2013 and February 2014

Dick GWA. Zika virus. II. Pathogenicity and physical properties. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 1952 Sep;46(5):521–34. Available from: Ovid: Welcome to Ovid